MONITORING OF ELIZABETH

It has been c2 months since Elizabeth has come home from the care home and we are all amazed by her progress.

Close monitoring of Elizabeth has been undertaken as she is on the drug Clozapine was being undertaken by the Home Treatment Team twice a day. This arrangement was pretty awful as it meant Elizabeth could not go anywhere or do much at all. Being on Clozapine meant that strict monitoring had to be done and they have increased the drug to exactly the same amount as it was originally. I also feel the visits by the Home Treatment Team are not just for health purposes but a way to record and report everything that is going on back to social services. The Home Treatment Team work very closely with social services – one of their nurses said to Elizabeth “it wont be long before you are going back to ……………… (The care home) …………….is coming to get you tomorrow.” Well one thing is for sure it is not for them or for me to decide upon. My close friend and family were sad to hear these comments and to read them. When I am at home in the evenings I have heard questions as to “have you been out today” said more than once to which Elizabeth will say “no” when in fact yesterday she was out with me in the evening and we went for a short walk. Today we went out for a longer walk as I am without my car right now, hoping to get it back from the garage tomorrow. I was talking to Elizabeth the other day – whilst she has been out with various friends of mine and has even gone fishing and now has a licence, we discussed about her having young companions to go out with and I am more than happy to provide/pay for this myself. I would consider suitable someone who is studying nursing/psychology and this could likewise benefit them as well. A young person could take Elizabeth to Zumba Classes during the week or swimming or cinema whilst I am at work. A young person – not me – could be just the thing to restore the shattered confidence of my daughter who now suffers from Agoraphobia. She is alright once out but the thought of going out can affect her to begin with – this is why I think someone from a nursing background would be most suitable or certainly someone who understands and who is caring. I would like Elizabeth to have a normal life and I believe integration into society to be very important not just mixing in with others who have mental health problems.

Elizabeth is complying with the drugs, is not a risk to herself or others she is doing well at home and can manage too. She has cooked dinner, she has tried to tidy up and clean, she remembers to feed the cat and said yesterday of her happiness to be at home. I am not pushing her to do anything much but do encourage her to go out with me at the weekends and was astonished that on three occasions she has come out in Central London with me amongst crowds and was OK.

This weekend we are going to a very nice event but I am not sure if Elizabeth will wish to stay all day – I hope the weather will be nice for this event.

I am also thinking of the possibility of a personal trainer coming to the house.

It is help for her to go out that is needed as she can manage in the house OK.

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3 comments
  1. Hi
    I have been reading your blog for some time now. I just want to say you are doing an amazing job with your daughter. I too have a daughter who is 17 now and gas been an inpatient on an adolescent MH ward on and off for the past 3 years. Her last admission lasted a whole year. I am glad to report that she was discharged in March and has recovered so well that she has gained a place a college to study health and social care as she wants to train to become a MH nurse. She had been unable to attend any education for the past 3 years as she was so ill. Also bearing in mind that before her discharge she had been on section for a whole year and was extremely suicidal. She did some very dangerous things and I have to pinch myself sometimes to remind me that she is still alive. I can’t believe how well she has done since being discharged. I have recently found out that she was discharged as the hospital had run out of ideas of how to help her. We too had the Home Treatment Team visiting. And the whole experience just made my daughter anxious as they just seemed to remind her that she was ill. She just wanted to get on with her life. She has refused medication throughout the whole time of her illness. Good luck with your daughter you are doing an amazing job and I am sure she is very grateful for the tremendous support and love that you give her.

  2. I have been reading your blog for some time now. I just want to say you are doing an amazing job with your daughter. I too have a daughter who is 17 now and gas been an inpatient on an adolescent MH ward on and off for the past 3 years. Her last admission lasted a whole year. I am glad to report that she was discharged in March and has recovered so well that she has gained a place a college to study health and social care as she wants to train to become a MH nurse. She had been unable to attend any education for the past 3 years as she was so ill. Also bearing in mind that before her discharge she had been on section for a whole year and was extremely suicidal. She did some very dangerous things and I have to pinch myself sometimes to remind me that she is still alive. I can’t believe how well she has done since being discharged. I have recently found out that she was discharged as the hospital had run out of ideas of how to help her. We too had the Home Treatment Team visiting. And the whole experience just made my daughter anxious as they just seemed to remind her that she was ill. She just wanted to get on with her life. She has refused medication throughout the whole time of her illness. Good luck with your daughter you are doing an amazing job and I am sure she is very grateful for the tremendous support and love that you give her.

    • This is very inspiring for me to read and I like to show positive things like this to Elizabeth. It is very hard for me to trust certain people in the team when they write things that are not nice behind your back especially when they do not even know much about the family. Along then comes others in the team who read such comments in the files and go by them. Because the care home is being paid for the team want her back and this was a fair distance from home and she told me the drugs had increased and certainly we never saw so many drugs before when she came to stay from the private hospital. It is a good thing that your daughter has managed so well without taking the drugs. I am noticing the drugs are affecting Elizabeth ‘s physical and drugging seems to be the only thing the for the rest of her life so to ensure this and total control despite her compliance this is where they once again get legal teams involved instead of helping the family and at great cost to the taxpayer. I cannot write any more on this but was being very open with events in the first instance . It is so good to hear something so positive. Thank you for telling me.

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